You are here

Yu Yongding
By Yu Yongding - May 22,2019
BEIJING — After a disappointing performance in 2018, China’s economy appears to be stabilising. In the first quarter of 2019, GDP growth, at 6.4 per cent year-on-year, matched that of the previous quarter.
By Yu Yongding - Mar 14,2019
BEIJING — The United States is reportedly pushing China to agree to keep the value of the renminbi stable, as part of a deal to end the trade war between the world’s two largest economies.
By Yu Yongding - Jan 12,2019
BEIJING — China’s economic performance in 2018 was rather disappointing. According to official statistics, the country’s growth rate up to the end of the third quarter was 6.7 per cent, the lowest since the global financial crisis.
By Yu Yongding - Oct 31,2018
FRANKFURT — The Sino-American trade war, initiated early this year by US President Donald Trump’s administration, is escalating rapidly.
By Yu Yongding - Jun 28,2018
BEIJING — No one wins in a trade war. Yet, US President Donald Trump seems determined to pursue one with China, which he accuses of causing America’s trade deficit, violating World Trade Organisation (WTO) rules, and using unfair practices to acquire foreign technology.
By Yu Yongding - Aug 24,2017
On August 11, 2015, the People’s Bank of China (PBOC) established that the central parity of the renminbi’s exchange rate against the US dollar would be set with reference to the previous trading day’s closing price, within a 2 per cent band.It was a bold step towards a more flex
By Yu Yongding - Jul 31,2016
China’s economic growth has been slowing for six years — far longer than expected.Eager to stem the slide, Chinese government officials and economists have desperately sought a clear explanation pointing towards an effective policy response.And, last November, they officially pla
By Yu Yongding - Aug 16,2015
At a time of slowing economic growth and massive corporate debts, a deflationary spiral would be China’s worst nightmare. And the risk is mounting.The producer price index (PPI) has been in negative territory for 39 consecutive months, since February 2012.
By Yu Yongding - May 27,2015
After four disappointing years, Chinese economists have realised that slowing GDP growth — from a post-crisis peak of 12.8 per cent in 2010 to about 7 per cent today — is mainly structural, rather than cyclical.In other words, China’s potential growth rate has settled onto a sign
By Yu Yongding - Dec 02,2014
Financial repression — government policies that create an environment of low or negative real interest rates, with the goal of generating cheap financing for public spending — has long been a key feature of Chinese economic policy. But with funding costs for business

Pages




Newsletter

Get top stories and blog posts emailed to you each day.