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Simon Johnson
By Simon Johnson - Nov 18,2019
WASHINGTON, DC — Since the end of World War II, the United States dollar has been at the heart of international finance and trade. Over the decades, and despite the many ups and downs of the global economy, the dollar retained its role as the world’s favorite reserve asset.
By Simon Johnson - Sep 02,2019
WASHINGTON, DC — The best way to think about the United Kingdom’s political predicament and presumed imminent exit from the European Union is to read the Slough House spy novel series by Mick Herron (the sixth installment, Joe Country, just appeared).
By Simon Johnson - Aug 01,2019
WASHINGTON, DC — Economic growth in the United States was just 2.5 per cent in 2018 and, according to the latest “advance” estimate, may have slowed to only 2.1 per cent in the second quarter of 2019.
By Simon Johnson - Jul 02,2019
WASHINGTON, DC — Around the world, the creation of good new jobs is increasingly concentrated in some of the largest cities. Innovative people want to work and live in close proximity to one another.
By Simon Johnson - Jun 04,2019
WASHINGTON, DC — To defeat populism requires coming to grips with a fundamental reality: bad economic policies no longer necessarily result in a government losing power.
By Simon Johnson - Apr 15,2019
WASHINGTON, DC — Populism is an approach to government that relies on lavish promises that ultimately cannot be met. The most prominent historical cases since 1945 were, for a long while, mostly found in Latin America.
By Simon Johnson - Mar 11,2019
WASHINGTON, DC — More than 3 million Americans, residents of the US commonwealth of Puerto Rico, could be plunged into economic turmoil unless President Donald Trump’s administration acts quickly.
By Simon Johnson - Feb 07,2019
WASHINGTON, DC — On January 25, a wave of relief spread across the United States. A completely pointless and highly damaging partial government shutdown was over.
By Simon Johnson - Jan 15,2019
WASHINGTON, DC — The contours of the 19th and early 20th century were defined in part by a series of consequential British foreign policy and economic decisions.
By Simon Johnson - Nov 10,2018
WASHINGTON, DC — Who can now sustain rapid economic growth? The answer to this question will determine not just the geography of prosperity in the coming decades, but also what the balance of global economic activity will look like in 2030 or 2050.

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