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Joseph S. Nye
By Joseph S. Nye - Dec 10,2018
CAMBRIDGE — The term “fake news” has become an epithet that US President Donald Trump attaches to any unfavourable story.
By Joseph S. Nye - Nov 07,2018
CAMBRIDGE — On a visit to Beijing in October, I was often asked whether US Vice President Mike Pence’s recent harsh criticism of China marked the declaration of a new cold war.
By Joseph S. Nye - Oct 10,2018
CAMBRIDGE — The key strategic issue in East Asia is the rise of Chinese power. Some analysts believe that China will seek a form of hegemony in East Asia that will lead to conflict.
By Joseph S. Nye - Sep 06,2018
CAMBRIDGE — In July, I joined 43 other scholars of international relations in paying for a newspaper advertisement arguing that the US should preserve the current international order.
By Joseph S. Nye - Aug 12,2018
CAMBRIDGE — By June 1 of this year, US President Donald Trump had made 3,259 false or misleading claims, according to The Washington Post Fact Checker’s database, which tracks and categorises every suspect statement uttered by the president.
By Joseph S. Nye - Jul 10,2018
CAMBRIDGE — It is frequently said that we are experiencing an information revolution. But what does that mean, and where is the revolution taking us?Information revolutions are not new. In 1439, Johannes Gutenberg’s printing press launched the era of mass communication.
By Joseph S. Nye - Jul 10,2018
CAMBRIDGE — For years, political leaders such as former US Secretary of Defence Leon Panetta have warned of the danger of a “cyber Pearl Harbour”. We have known for some time that potential adversaries have installed malicious software in our electricity grid.
By Joseph S. Nye - May 10,2018
CAMBRIDGE — Many experts have proclaimed the death of the post-1945 liberal international order, including the human-rights regime set forth in the 1948 Universal Declaration of Human Rights.
By Joseph S. Nye - Nov 19,2017
In 2008, when the United States’ National Intelligence Council (NIC) published its volume Global Trends 202, a key prediction was tighter energy competition. Chinese demand was growing, and non-OPEC sources like the North Sea were being depleted.
By Joseph S. Nye - Apr 17,2017
I frequently travel overseas, and invariably my foreign friends ask, with varying degrees of bewilderment: What in the world is going on in your country?Here is what I say. First, do not misinterpret the 2016 election.Contrary to some commentary, the American political

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