You are here

Pursuing a rational policy

Aug 07,2017 - Last updated at Aug 07,2017

In a rare display of unity, the UN Security Council unanimously adopted a resolution imposing additional sanctions on North Korea, after Pyongyang carried out two intercontinental ballistic missile (ICBM) tests over the past few weeks with a potential of carrying nuclear warheads.

Despite international outcry, North Korean leader Kim Jong-un has been proceeding with the testing of strategic missiles potentially capable of reaching continental US — though experts are sceptic about the missiles' capability. 

US President Donald Trump has been hinting at resorting to force against Pyongyang if it continues to test long-range missiles, but, fortunately, he has stopped short of using force.

The latest UN resolution saw both Russia and China joining other Security Council members in adopting additional punitive measures against the Kim regime, but insisted that no use of force should be entertained to contain North Korea's nuclear threats.

This would suggest a deal has been reached over the North Korean missile programme between Washington on the one hand and Moscow and Beijing on the other by agreeing to a tougher resolution calling for biting economic sanctions in return for refraining from the use of force against Pyongyang.

However, after the adoption of the resolution, US Ambassador to the UN Nikki Haley insisted that the resort to force against North Korea is not off the table yet, at least in theory. 
The use of force against Pyongyang is not an advisable policy, since it could devolve into a full-out nuclear confrontation, causing the death of many civilians and the destruction of the Korean Peninsula.

As bad as it is to test ICBMs by North Korea, the use of force would be even worse. 

As long as Kim Jong-un is not explicitly threatening any country with his missile arsenal, there is no real pressing justification for the resort to force and a devastating war.

Several countries already possess ICBMs and nuclear weapons, but none of them have actually been threatened with force to stop their ICBM programmes. 

A unified rational policy is required universally to curb the proliferation of these weapons.

 

If the same non-discriminatory policy can be applied to all nuclear nations, including North Korea, then the international community can succeed in easing the growing tension over Pyongyang's missile programme.  

up
44 users have voted.

Comments

EXCELLENT ARTICLE THAT VALIDATES BOTH THE INTENDED AND UNITENDED CONSIQUENCES OF THIS NUKE MONOPOLY IN AN UNDEMACRATIC MEANS. WHILE I DO NOT WANT TO LIVE IN ANY CRAZY COUNTRY TOYING WITH NUKES, THE FACT IS THAT THE NUCLER PROGRAM HAS BECOME THE ONLY INSURACE PROGRAM FOR THE SURVIVAL OF SMALL AND DEVELOPING COUNTRIES SO FOR KIM TO GIVE AWAY HIS TOYS MEANS DEATH AS SEEN IN THE CASE OF SADDAM AND THE HOST OF OTHERS. NO BODY WANTS WAR AND ANY SUCH WAR COULD WIPE OUT A SIGNIFICANT POPULATION OF THE WORLD TODAY.

Add new comment

CAPTCHA
This question is for testing whether or not you are a human visitor and to prevent automated spam submissions.
8 + 8 =
Solve this simple math problem and enter the result. E.g. for 1+3, enter 4.

Newsletter

Get top stories and blog posts emailed to you each day.