AMMAN — Jordan scored 48 points in Transparency International’s (TI) Corruption Perception Index (CPI) 2012, published on Wednesday, a result that placed it in the top one-third of the indexed countries.

Two-thirds of the 176 countries ranked in the 2012 index scored below 50, on a scale from 0, perceived to be highly corrupt, to 100, perceived to be very clean.

The Kingdom’s ranking dropped to 58th among the 176 indexed countries, compared to 56th in 2011 and 50th in 2010, according to a statement posted on TI’s website.

Jordan’s ranking declined, despite the Anti-Corruption Commission (ACC) dealing with 714 corruption complaints in 2011, 36 of which were referred to the commission’s prosecutor general, according to an ACC report released Tuesday.

TI Chairperson Huguette Labelle urged governments to integrate anti-corruption actions into all public decision making, according to the statement.

The Kingdom ranked the fourth least corrupt among Arab countries, outranked by Qatar, the United Arab Emirates and Bahrain.

TI said in the statement that the data shows “that public institutions need to be more transparent, and powerful officials more accountable”.

Denmark, Finland and New Zealand scored 90 in the CPI and tied for the first place.

TI cited strong access to information systems and rules governing the behaviour of those in public positions as the main reasons behind these countries’ high ranking.

In an interview with The Jordan Times and Al Rai, published Wednesday, His Majesty King Abdullah said that a national integrity system will be in place soon, entailing a code of conduct binding for all workers in the public sector.

Conflict-ridden Iraq, Sudan and Somalia again clung to the bottom rung of Arab countries in the index.

TI cited the lack of accountable leadership and effective public institutions, which underscore the need to take a much stronger stance against corruption in these countries.