Removing abandoned cars from the streets of Amman was a long overdue measure.

It was reported in the media that 1,200 abandoned cars were removed from different areas in Amman.

However, as a concerned citizen and self-claimed environmentalist, I walk around in this city whenever I can, and I see “things” that warrant more urgent attention and action than abandoned cars.

These “things”, and I mean garbage, create bad odors, encourage stray cats, rats and all sorts of insects, are hazardous to public sanitation, and are an eye sore.

Some citizens, unfortunately, contribute to this natural buildup of garbage. Few complain. And passersby choose to remain passive or at best ignore the sight. Above all, the municipality is doing nothing about it.

True, Amman is a big city. But big should not mean bad. The last big city I visited was Istanbul. I walked there for miles and miles. Istanbul has a population of more than 13 million, according to 2011 statistics. Amman is six times smaller with its more than 2 million inhabitants. Yet, we make and accumulate more visible garbage than Istanbulis.

There is a significant number of such dumping grounds in Amman that urgently need to be checked out and cleaned up.

I suggest an educational and awareness tour of these not so clandestine locations for all the “environmentalists” in our midst.

Saleem Ayoub Quna,
Amman